Fostering

Read everything below and then fill out our Adoption Application (one of the questions lets you tell us you’re interested in fostering).

Why do we need foster homes?
Rabbits get individual attention in our foster homes. Fosterers can tell potential adopters how the rabbits behave in a home environment, how well they use a litter box, how good they are on a carpet, whether they are low-, medium-, or high-speed chewers, and so forth. Loving foster homes are the backbone of our rescue operation.

What are my responsibilities as a foster parent?
Your main responsibility is to keep the foster rabbits safe, clean and fed, and to socialize them to enhance their adoptability. Secondary responsibilities may include transporting to the Saturday adoption venue when potential adopters inquire about your foster rabbits, or showing rabbits to potential adopters at other times, taking rabbits to the veterinarian if they get sick, etc. In certain cases, transportation is arranged for the foster homes.

Your specific responsibilities as a foster home and our responsibilities as the rabbit welfare group you are fostering for, are detailed in the Foster Home Contract which we will give you prior to fostering for your review. Please also read our care information.

How long will I have to foster a rabbit before s/he finds a home?
Time-to-adoption is not always predictable, although some types of rabbit are more in demand than others. We’ve had foster rabbits place in days, and we’ve had foster rabbits take years to place. Most take a few months, depending on the rabbits’ adoptability and the laws of supply and demand. Much depends on the effort you put into socializing and house-training your foster rabbits and whether or not you bring them to our adoption venue. It’s important that you discuss your expectations with the Foster Home Coordinator prior to fostering.

Ultimately, it’s your decision how long you wish to foster. But we ask for at least two weeks’ notice if you can no longer foster, in order to give us time to find a new foster home.

Can I just foster for one or two weeks at a time?
Yes. Someone has to care for the rabbits when our long-term foster homes are out of town. It isn’t fair for foster homes to pay for boarding or a sitter, so we have a need for short-term living arrangements for our rabbits.

What if my foster rabbit suddenly gets sick?
Call the Foster Home Coordinator to determine if a trip to the veterinarian or emergency clinic is in order. All veterinary expenses will be covered or reimbursed by Los Angeles Rabbit Foundation apart from the exceptions stipulated in the Foster Home Contract.

What supplies does Los Angeles Rabbit Foundation provide to fosterers?
We supply an exercise pen or baby gate if needed, a litter box, gallon jug of vinegar for cleaning, water and food bowls as needed, initial litter, hay, and pelleted food. We may provide other supplies, toys, and greens when we bring the rabbits to your home for fostering.

Hay is provided free as needed on an ongoing basis, funds permitting. Foster homes are encouraged to purchase pellets and greens on a go-forward basis unless this becomes a financial hardship. It is our goal, however, to eventually cover all foster home expenses. If you can’t foster at this time but can donate, we appreciate your help.

Are foster homes screened?
Absolutely. We wouldn’t want anyone to foster who doesn’t meet the same high standards we have for our adopters. It’s only fair to the rabbits and the foster homes. As a fosterer, you may decide to adopt your rabbits later on. Therefore, to foster a rabbit, you must first fill out an Adoption Application.

GUIDELINES
– Rabbits must be housed indoors 100% of the time, in a cage-free environment (playpens ok).
– No homes with predators, and no visitors with the same.
– Additional care stipulations are outlined in the Foster Contract.

Example Foster Home Setups

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